Picking a Healthy Plant

When it comes to getting started with your garden, you have two choices; planting seeds, or buying entire plants. Both have their own benefits. If you plant seeds and care for them every day, you will find it is a much more rewarding experience when you have a full, healthy plant. However, this method is a lot more risky. I can’t tell you how many seeds I’ve planted and never seen any trace of whatsoever.

If you choose to buy the plant from a nursery and install it in your garden, it reduces a lot of the work involved in making it healthy. However, I have found in the past that many incompetent nursery workers will absolutely ruin the future of the plant by putting certain chemicals or fertilizers in. I have adapted to this incompetence by learning to choose the healthiest plant of the bunch. Here I will discuss some of the techniques I use in my screening process for plants.

It may sound superficial, but the one thing you need to check for on your prospective plants is how nice they look. As far as plants go, you can truly judge a book by its cover. If a plant has been treated healthily and has no diseases or pests, you can almost always tell by how nice it looks. If a plant has grown up in improper soil, or has harmful bugs living in it, you can tell from the holey leaves and wilted stems.

If you’re browsing the nursery shelves looking for your dream plant, you want to exclude anything that currently has flowers. Plants are less traumatized by the transplant if they do not currently have any flowers. It’s best to find ones that just consist of buds. However if all you have to choose from are flowering plants, then you should do the unthinkable and sever all of them. It will be worth it for the future health of the plant. I’ve found that transplanting a plant while it is blooming results in having a dead plant ninety percent of the time.

Always check the roots before you plop down the money to purchase the plant. Of course if the roots are in absolutely terrible condition you will be able to tell by looking at the rest of the plant. But if the roots are just slightly out of shape, then you probably won’t be able to tell just by looking at it. Inspect the roots very closely for any signs of brownness, rottenness, or softness. The roots should always be a firm, perfectly well formed infrastructure that holds all the soil together. One can easily tell if the roots are before or past their prime, depending on the root to soil ratio. If there are a ridiculous amount of roots with little soil, or a bunch of soil with few roots, you should not buy that plant.

If you find any abnormalities with the plant, whether it be the shape of the roots or any irregular features with the leaves, you should ask the nursery employees. While usually these things can be the sign of an unhealthy plant, occasionally there will be a logical explanation for it. Always give the nursery a chance before writing them off as horrendous. After all, they are (usually) professionals who have been dealing with plants for years.

So if you decide to take the easy route and get a plant from a nursery, you just have to remember that the health of the plants has been left up to someone you don’t know. Usually they do a good job, but you should always check for yourself. Also take every precaution you can to avoid transplant shock in the plant (when it has trouble adjusting to its new location, and therefore has health problems in the future). Usually the process goes smoothly, but you can never be too sure.

Other Factors in Garden Creation

So now you’ve picked out what type of garden you will have, what the
location will be, and what kind of fertilizer you need, now is the time to
really get started in choosing your garden environment. First you’ll want
to choose what your garden barriers will be. What will separate your
garden from the rest of the world? Next you’ll want to choose the
decorations and support for your plants. Often some kind of metal mesh is
necessary to keep your plant standing up. You will also want to choose how
much soil and fertilizer to buy, and how to arrange all the plants in your
garden.

Choosing a border is actually a fairly important step in getting your
garden started. It might not actually affect the well-being of the plants,
but having a garden is a fairly aesthetic ordeal for many people anyways.
So usually you will want to choose between metal and wood. You can stack
up boards around the perimeter of your garden, and give it a rather nice
cabin look. If you’re looking for a more modern look, you can obtain some
metal lining at your local home improvement store for rather cheap, and
installation is medium difficulty.

Finding something nice-looking to support your plants can be a little bit
more challenging. Sometimes a short metal pole can work well, but often
for plants such as tomatoes you will need a wire mesh for it to pull
itself up on. You can find these at any gardening store, usually
pre-shaped in a sort of cone shape ideal for plants. The plant just grows
up through it, and usually it will last until the plant is grown enough to
support itself. After that you can take a pair of wire-cutters and just
snip it free.

Deciding how much soil to buy can be slightly easier. Look up information
on your plants and find out the ideal soil depth. Then dig out that much
from your garden, take the measurements, and find out the exact amount of
cubic feet of soil that you will need. Go to the store and buy it,
preferably adding on a few bags just so you can replenish the supply if it
compresses or runs out. If you live in an area where the ground is rough,
dry, and barren of nutrients, then you might even want to add a few inches
of depth to the original recommendation.

Arranging the plants is rather important to the success of your garden.
I’m not talking about some kind of feng-shui thing, but depending on your
watering, some plants might hog all the water and leave the other plants
high and dry. Some plants have longer roots than others, and are more
aggressive in the collection of water. If you place one of these plants
next to a plant with weaker, shorter roots, it will quickly hijack the
water supply for itself, and choke out the other plant.

I hope I’ve led you to realize that placement isn’t the only important
thing about a garden. There are many other factors that might not seem
very significant, but spending a proper amount of time considering them
could change the outcome of your garden. So if you’re working on building
a garden, use and reference you can (the library, the internet, and
magazines) to look in to some of the factors I’ve mentioned.

Risk Factors And Symptoms Of Diabetes

Blood glucose levels are controlled by insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas which lowers the blood-glucose level. When food is consumed and digested, our blood-glucose levels become elevated. This would in turn trigger the release of insulin to normalize the blood-glucose levels by promoting the uptake of glucose into our cells. Diabetes affects an estimate of 29.1 million people, 9.3% of the population, in the United States. In addition, another 86 million people may have prediabetes and they do not know it.

Over a long period of time, diabetes may lead to blindness, kidney failure and nerve damage. These are the result of damage to small vessels which is referred to as microvascular disease. Diabetes also plays an important factor in accelerating the hardening and narrowing of the arteries which would then lead to strokes, coronary heart disease and other large blood vessel diseases which is known as macrovascular disease.

Some causes of diabetes are due to the insufficient production of insulin, production of defective insulin or the cell’s inability to use insulin properly and efficiently. The cell’s inability to use insulin properly and efficiently affects mostly the muscle cells as well as fat tissues. This results in insulin resistance which is the main problem in type 2 diabetes. The absolute lack of insulin is the main disorder in type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, a steady decline of beta cells add on to the process of elevated blood sugars. Basically, if a person is resistant to insulin, the body can, to a certain extent, increase production of insulin thus overcoming the level of resistance. Overtime, if production decreases resulting in a slowdown of the release of insulin, diabetes develops.

There is no definite way to know if you have diabetes without having to undergo blood tests to determine your blood-glucose levels. As a result, many people are unaware that they have diabetes, especially in the early stages when symptoms may not be present.

However, some of the potential early tell-tale signs of diabetes are:
1. Increase urine output which would then lead to dehydration. Dehydration would also cause increased thirst as well as water consumption
2. Weight loss would still occur despite an increase in appetite resulting from a relative or absolute insulin deficiency
3. Fatigue
4. Nausea and vomiting
5. Frequent infections such as infections of the bladder, skin and vaginal areas.
6. Blurred vision may also occur as a result of fluctuations in blood-glucose levels

Some people are more prone to diabetes due to certain risk factors. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are not well understood but family history is a known risk factor for type 1. On the other hand, many risk factors are known for type 2 diabetes and some of these factors are:
1. Being overweight or obese
2. High blood pressure
3. Family history
4. Sedentary lifestyle
5. Increasing age